Equipment versus Body

Dougie gave me the inspiration for this blogpost, as he is the only surfer on the beach that I ever see doing any kind of warm up or cool down stretch. Recently he made the observation on the number of surfers who frequently buy new performance surfboards but are not taking the time to improve and optimise their own physical ability, hence are slow to get to their feet due to being so stiff and are therefore unable to get the most from the shiny new board.

Many of us who practise a sport or activity find great pleasure in buying new equipment, be it surf boards, bikes, running shoes or yoga mats – especially when the chosen sport can’t be played or practised at that moment in time but you can prepare by going shopping online! Why? Not only does it gives us the instant gratification of an exciting new purchase and the anticipation of receiving and getting to use the new board/ bike/ shoes, it gives us the sense that it will enhance our abilities and performance.

When the average cost of a new surfboard is £650, and with the majority of surfers buying at least one a year, they could be investing in 100 yoga classes for the cost of one board. There’s no denying that good quality equipment is essential in any sport, but can continued investment in toys and equipment take priority over investment in long term physical health ie. strength, flexibility and mobility? Thankfully yoga is becoming more and more sort after by athletes, and is practised by almost all professionals, but there is still a resistance from many amateurs in caring for their long-term health and physical functioning.

The development and enhancement of our natural bio-mechanics obviously allows us to optimise the use of our equipment but when amateur athletes are over-relying on their equipment and neglecting taking the time to improve and maintain their physical functionality, is it the pleasure of having new fancy equipment, and having it instantly, that appeals more than spending regular time, consistently on physical health and functionality?

Where we live, surfing is obviously a huge part of life, where some surfers are buying multiple boards each year. Could they be ‘sacrificing’ one of these extra beauties to invest in going to yoga? Why? Surfers commonly suffer with tight hips and hamstrings, which yoga can help to release tension from and maintain flexibility – enhancing mobility and the ability to turn on the board. Lower back ache from muscle tension is also a frequent complaint that yoga can alleviate. Then there is the enhanced lung capacity, balance, coordination and strength that can all be developed. Just look at Gerry Lopez, who is nearly 70 and still surfing like he was 50 years ago!

Similar things can be said for biking and running, on which I have written plenty before!

What to do next:

Buy a Class Pass, £65 for 10 classes, and commit to regular yoga classes. Or try a one to one.

Come on Yoga Retreat Portugal where you can get into the habit of practising yoga twice a day, plus enjoy the surf or the trails.

Invest in your technique and come on a Yoga Flow Running retreat.

Surfers who do yoga – Dave Rastavich, Jamie Sterling, Tia Blanco, Gerry Lopez, Greg Long