What makes healthy hips? Relief for 4 common hip complaints

The hips are made up of many intricate muscles, each with their own functions and actions, but working together in harmony, as a community. Well, that is the ideal scenario! The fact is though, many of us are living with muscular or structural imbalance in at least one area of our hips, which will sooner or later manifest itself as pain, injury or dysfunction.

The hips have a lot of work to do! They support all the weight of the torso and upper body, as well as control movement of the legs. Some parts get sat on and lazy, whilst other parts get left to do the hard work.

Let’s have a look at a few key areas that are commonly tight and weak, with a brief overview on how yoga can help. To learn more, come along to the Healthy Hips workshop on 11th June.

Commonly Tight Areas:
Iliopsoas – The psoas and iliacus are two muscles that work closely together in their role as primary hip flexors and stabilisers. They contract as you lift your knee, so over doing this repetitively can create an excess of tension. Even sitting for long periods of time will build tightness here.
What to do: low lunge to relengthen.

Piriformis – A small, deep external hip rotator, that supports and stabilises, amongst other functions. Located in the centre of your bum, if this gets tight it can restrict your range of movement and potentially compress the sciatic nerve (piriformis syndrome), causing nerve pain.
What to do: figure 4 stretch to ease out tension.

Commonly Weak Areas:
Gluteous medius – these muscles stabilise our pelvis from either side and unfortunately can often be weak and tight! If balancing on one leg, whilst keep your hips level, is difficult this could be an indication of weakness.
What to do: side lying lifts, tree pose

(Lower) Gluteous Maximus – Our largest muscles! We all sit too much, which means our poor lower gluteous maximus bum muscle gets bored and lazy, then forgets how to do it’s job when it’s actually required! This means that the upper part of the glut max has to work twice as hard to compensate. So, whilst LGM gets lazy and weak, UGM gets over-worked and tight – not ideal for optimal healthy hip balance and function.
What to do: hip lifts – watch here!

Reserve your place on the Healthy Hips workshop here.**


**Please note, this 3 hour workshop is not suitable for someone with a current injury, a one to one session is recommended instead. Ask for details or if you are unsure.